FAQs

Clever Buoy is a rapid prototype, proof of concept R&D project that aims to develop shark detection technology. They are smart ocean buoys that detect large swimming objects, like sharks, and send real-time valuable information to lifeguards on the beach.

The Clever Buoy utilises new sonar technology to detect shark-sized objects in coastal waters. The sonar is looking for large shark-sized objects that are swimming. When detection is made by the Clever Buoy, an alert will be sent to relevant audiences using Google+ circles, via the Optus Network.

Shark detections are alerted via a signal on shore. The data is also shared with relevant audiences using Google+ circles, so that the right information, reaches the right people, at the right time.

The Clever Buoy in its BETA, R&D phase, currently detects a shark-like object of two meters or more in length. Future development of the buoy will involve inbuilt decision–making systems, which will attempt to differentiate the object as a shark or mammal such as a dolphin or whale, with an appropriate response.

The Clever Buoy uses sophisticated software that differentiates between the length of an object, and its propulsion through the water.

In testing it has been identified that sharks create a distinctive sonar signature and swimming pattern that is different to mammals. The Clever Buoy sonar will adapt and develop with increasing knowledge of the difference between a shark’s sonar signature and movement pattern and that of other sea life. The development is similar to the development of ‘face recognition’ software in humans.

Future iterations of the Clever Buoy could potentially identify acoustic signatures, anatomical characteristics such as jaw size and lungs, as well as swimming patterns to continually develop more sophisticated detection algorithms.

Signatures were captured during testing in the Sydney Aquarium and the Abrolhos Islands in Western Australia that will enable the Clever Buoy to further differentiate between sea life in the future. For instance, a human, a dolphin, seal, large ray or school of fish create very different patterns on the sonar.

The sonar and its associated software is able to identify a shark-like object of two meters or more in length. The system utilises intuitive software that continues to develop and learn the details of what it is designed to detect.

Traditional sonar has had limited success in being able to detect sharks. The Clever Buoy uses new, intuitive software that continues to develop and learn the details of what it is designed to detect.

The Clever Buoy’s sonar has successfully identified sharks during testing phases in Sydney Aquarium and the Abrolhos Islands.

The maximum sonar detection range is currently estimated at around 60metres if deployed in deep water. Shallower water may reduce the range.

The Clever Buoy in its BETA, R&D phase, currently detects a shark like object of two meters or more in length.

As a result of testing at the Sydney Aquarium and in the Abrolhos Islands, the Clever Buoy is clear on what a shark signature looks like, but not shark species at this stage. Future development of the system will aim to identify between species of shark.

As a result of testing at the Sydney Aquarium and in the Abrolhos Islands, the Clever Buoy is clear on what a shark signature looks like.

In testing it has been identified that sharks create a distinctive sonar signature and swimming pattern that is different to mammals. The Clever Buoy will adapt and develop with increasing knowledge of the difference between a shark’s patterns and that of other sea life.

Sonar signatures were captured during testing that will enable the Clever Buoy to further differentiate between sea life in the future.

The Clever Buoy rapid prototype, proof of concept, has undergone testing in Sydney Aquarium and the Abrolhos Islands with positive early results. The technology effectively identifies objects over two meters or more and can now specifically identify a shark signature.

The Clever Buoy in its R&D phase is autonomously powered by battery.

Future versions of the Clever Buoy are expected to be self-sustaining for power, by way of solar or potentially wave power.

As the Clever Buoy is currently in R&D phase, none are currently employed in an official remit on Australian beaches.

Future versions of the Clever Buoy are expected to be self-sustaining for power, by way of solar or potentially wave power.

The R&D iteration of the Clever Buoy utilises sonar technology to detect shark-sized objects in coastal areas. When detection is made by the Clever Buoy, an alert will be sent to relevant audiences using Google+ circles, via the Optus Network.

The current model of the Clever Buoy does not repel sharks.

When the Clever Buoy is commercially ready we expect that it will be within the practical reach of the normal operational budgets of regional and local government authorities around the world, who are charged with the responsibility of beach safety.

The Clever Buoy is being developed primarily as a shark detection solution.

The Clever Buoy aims to provide an alternative, non-invasive shark detection solution.

As a result of testing at the Sydney Aquarium and in the Abrolhos Islands, the Clever Buoy is clear on what a shark signature looks like.

In testing it has been identified that sharks create a distinctive sonar signature and swimming pattern that is different to mammals. The Clever Buoy sonar will adapt and develop with increasing knowledge of the difference between a shark’s patterns and that of other sea life.

Signatures were captured during testing in the Sydney Aquarium and the Abrolhos Islands that will enable the Clever Buoy to further differentiate between sea life in the future. For instance, a human, a dolphin, seal, large ray or school of fish create very different patterns on the sonar.

The Clever Buoy has undergone testing in the shark tanks at the Sydney Aquarium, Port Stephens and in the Abrolhos Islands off the Coast of Western Australia.

The level of sonar projected via the Clever Buoy is not harmful to sea life.

Shark Mitigation Systems are a technology company focussed on mitigating the risk of shark attack. Shark Mitigation Systems develop non-invasive, commercial solutions to detect and, where possible, deter sharks.

Shark Mitigation Systems previously released SAMS Technology a shark deterrent design technology that is applied to wetsuits to reduce the chance of shark attack based on new science in the field of shark vision and neurology.

The Clever Buoy is designed to help lifeguards protect people and sharks around our coastlines.

Optus and SMS are interested in talking to lifeguards and councils to see if the Clever Buoy can help them to better protect people and sharks around our coastlines.

The collaboration between Optus and Shark Mitigation Systems has kick-started a developmental journey towards making the ‘Clever Buoy’, a non-invasive solution to detect and protect sharks, as well as protect people on coastlines around the globe.

Optus has funded the first R&D phase of the Clever Buoy.

Clever Buoys are powered by the Optus Network.

Optus in partnership with Google share a vision to use technology to enhance people’s lives and have worked together to combine their resources and expertise to make this vision a reality in the Clever Buoy.

The Clever Buoy utilises sonar technology to detect shark-sized objects in coastal waters. When detection is made by the Clever Buoy, an alert will be sent to relevant audiences using Google+ circles, via the Optus Network.

The Google+ Circles are used when a detection is made and translates the signal on a mobile device to alert a lifeguard.

PARTNERS
  • Optus
  • Google
  • Shark Mitigation Systems
  • M&C Saatchi
  • UVS
  • Fuel
  • Liquid Thread
  • Sydney Aquarium
  • Inmarsat